Problems>Solutions>Innovations

Lyn Buchanan's CRV FAQS

Can Your Imagination Mess Things Up?

Question:

How will I know CRV works and that it's not just my very vivid imagination? I assume I'd be taught this, but if you can describe it briefly, I might just shell out all my money for you.

Answer:

Herein lies the importance of databasing and real-world targeting. If you work targets like "sub-space beings", "other dimensional entities" and even this-world stuff like "aura enhancement" or "chakra alignment", you are working things which have no hard and fast feedback. There is no way to tell whether you are remote viewing or imagining. The fact that 2 or 10 or even hundreds of people get the same information on these targets is no indicator of validity. The "Shelldrake effect", cultural patterns, public dispersal of information, telepathy, and a myriad of other factors can produce hundreds of people "getting" the same thing, without remote viewing taking place at all.

However, if you use targets (especially during training) which do have hard feedback, you can look at your session and judge it in light of the real target.

So what is it that lets you know if you were imagining things? Being able to judge your session against real-world, hard, no-nonsense feedback.

But beyond that, what is it that lets you avoid just imagining things each time you work and actually trains you to never let your imagination run wild? Databasing and analyzing your results and learning from them. In the process, you find out what works and what doesn't. Keep doing what works, stop doing what doesn't. That principle holds true for anything you try to do.

The big thing that CRV training offers is over 24 years of the collected trial and error experiences of a lot of people trying everything they could imagine, finding out what does and doesn't work, and adding that information into a central database repository for all the others to learn. You could buy yourself a computer and do the same, but then it would take you the next 24 years to catch up to where we are now, and then only if you had a lot of other people working on it with you.